Der Tod in Venedig

Der Tod in Venedig The Novella Death In Venice Was Written By The German Author Thomas Mann, And Was First Published In As Der Tod In Venedig The Plot Of The Work Presents A Great Writer Suffering Writer S Block Who Visits Venice And Is Liberated And Uplifted, Then Increasingly Obsessed, By The Sight Of A Stunningly Beautiful Youth Though He Never Speaks To The Boy, Much Less Touches Him, The Writer Finds Himself Drawn Deep Into Ruinous Inward Passion Meanwhile Venice, And Finally The Writer Himself, Succumb To A Cholera Plague The Novella Is Powerfully Intertextual, With The Chief Sources Being First The Connection Of Erotic Love To Philosophical Wisdom Traced In Plato S Symposium And Phaedrus, And Second The Nietzschean Contrast Between The God Of Restraint And Shaping Form, Apollo, And The God Of Excess And Passion, Dionysus

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[Reading] ➽ Der Tod in Venedig By Thomas Mann – Webcamtopladies.info
  • Paperback
  • 119 pages
  • Der Tod in Venedig
  • Thomas Mann
  • 05 July 2017
  • 9780140183542

10 thoughts on “Der Tod in Venedig

  1. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  2. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  3. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  4. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  5. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  6. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  7. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  8. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  9. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

  10. says:

    Brilliant prose, expertly crafted, and an audacious, masterful blending of mythology, allusion and symbolism In many ways, a work of considerable genius.Unfortunately, the story itself felt ho hum and left me cold and rather unenthused Given this considerable dichotomy, between the me that was significantly impressed by Mann s obvious talent, and the emotional, enjoyment centric me left wanting by a narrative that seemed dry and lifeless, I ve resolved to revisit this work in a few years it s only 150 pages for a follow up Hopefully, at that point, one of me will hold sway For nowboth of me will straddle the fence of wishy washy indecision However, regardless of whether my future interactions with the story add to or subtract from my first impression, there s no denying that there is much to admire, even be amazed by, in this slim, tightly compacted work loaded with full bodied ideas I just wished for a deeper connection to the characters and the tale PLOT SUMMARY It s the early 20th century, and in a decaying Europe that is drifting towards war, an austere, deeply repressed author suffers from a severe bout of writer s block To clear his mind and get his creative juices flowing again, Gustav von Aschenbach takes a holiday and winds up amidst the beautiful decadence of Venice This was Venice, the flattering and suspect beauty this city, half fairy tale and half tourist trap, in whose insalubrious air the arts once rankly and voluptuously blossomed, where composers have been inspired to lulling tones of somniferous eroticism. While there, von Aschensbach becomes infatuated with the striking, classical beauty of a teenage boy named Tadzio Slowly, the writer begins to lose control of his emotional austerity as his long bottled passions avalanche over him Despite never acting on his impulse of having any contact with the youth whatsoever, von Aschenbach s infatuation descends into a destructive obsession that leaves him unhinged and adrift from his rationality.Meanwhile, a deadly cholera epidemic is stealthily spreading through the city, and von Aschenbach, though he can feel the onset of symptoms, is too enthralled to make his escape Eventuallya death occursin Venice THOUGHTS Despite being written by a German author about a Prussian author, and set in 20th century Italy, this story has Greek tragedy written all over it Mann s story is steeped in allusions to mythology, and is strongly influenced by Plato s The Symposium and Phaedrus, carrying forward their central arguments regarding the man s struggle between passion and wisdom.Having not read either of these works, I m sure there are some references that strolled right past me without me having a clue they were even in the room Nevertheless, I don t think a familiarity with these texts is essential to enjoying this story, though it could certainly enhance it.In keeping with the Greek sympathies central to Mann s novella, the relationship between von Aschenbach and Tadzio the boy is clearly a reference to the platonic ideal of erotic love described by Plato and Socrates Additionally, Mann includes a whole host of mythological allusions to highlight our protagonist s psychological and physical demise, beginning with von Aschenbach s gondola ride into Venice that mirrors the journey of many a Greek hero into Hades At its heart, this is a cautionary tale regarding the danger of extremes, and the need to maintain a sense of balance in the conduct of one s life Mann shows us someone who has lived a carefully controlled, passion free life in the pursuit of moral, intellectual art When we first encounter von Aschenbach, he is an emotional corpse existing in the extreme state of pure reason and utter sensual denial Mann shows us this not as an ideal, but as one end of the spectrum to be avoided Now, when confronted with the exotic, sensation filled atmosphere of Venice, von Aschenbach s suppressed desires bubble to the surface, and his carefully constructed, intellect driven world crumbles in the face of the onslaught His head and his heart were drunk, and his steps followed the dictates of that dark god whose pleasure it is to trample man s reason and dignity underfoot Swiftly, our protagonist finds himself at the other extreme, a slave to his passions, the object of which is encapsulated in the character of Tadzio Excessively rigid morality exchanged for unrestrained passion reason abandoned and moderation impossible, von Aschenbach s world deteriorates under the weight of his unchecked desires It is his falling from one extreme to another, and his inability to achieve a balance, that leads eventually to his self destruction My biggest problem with the above is that understood it without feeling it I would spot an allusion that Mann was incorporating and think how impressive it was but it never translated into an emotional connection to the story Thus, I was kept at a distance from the story, and this left me feeling less enad with the work as a whole, than its prodigious technical achievements might otherwise merit Still, as I mention above, there is much to love about this work, and part of my tepid reaction to the story may be my unfamiliarity with some of the source texts that Mann draws upon for inspiration I intend to visit Plato s The Symposium and or Phaedrus, and check back in with this work further down the road For now, an impressed 3.5 stars Highly recommended.

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