Britains War Machine

Britains War Machine GUARDIAN BOOKS OF THE YEARThe Familiar Image Of The British In The Second World War Is That Of The Plucky Underdog Taking On German Might David Edgerton S Bold, Compelling New History Shows The Conflict In A New Light, With Britain As A Very Wealthy Country, Formidable In Arms, Ruthless In Pursuit Of Its Interests And Sitting At The Heart Of A Global Production SystemThe British, Indeed Churchillian, Vision Of War And Modernity Was Challenged By Repeated Defeat By Less Well Equipped Enemies Yet The End Result Was A Vindication Of This Vision Like The United States, A Powerful Britain Won A Cheap Victory, While Others Paid A Great Price Britain S War Machine, By Putting Resources, Machines And Experts At The Heart Of A Global Rather Than Merely Imperial Story, Demolishes Some Of The Most Cherished Myths About Wartime Britain And Gives Us A Very Different And Often Unsettling Picture Of A Great Power In Action

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❰Reading❯ ➿ Britains War Machine  Author David Edgerton – Webcamtopladies.info
  • Paperback
  • 442 pages
  • Britains War Machine
  • David Edgerton
  • English
  • 08 January 2018
  • 9780141026107

10 thoughts on “Britains War Machine

  1. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  2. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  3. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  4. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  5. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  6. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  7. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  8. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  9. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

  10. says:

    So our poor old Empire is alone in the world Aye, we are the whole five hundred million of us An economic history of the British Empire during the Second World War Goes against the conventional story of a small island alone against the rest of Europe Edgerton emphasizes the British having a vast, multicontinental empire, with a massive navy and merchant marine, as well as the resources to produce modern war equipment en masse as well as to innovate The navy and air force were Britain s greatest strengths, and the army, although small, was well equipped in his estimates he even makes pains to rehabilitate the British tanks The people of the British Isles were also well fed though the rest of the Empire wasn t always so, especially the Bengals and the Blitz, as bad as it was, was ultimately less horrific the devastation which befell nearly every other country in Europe.Of all things, Edgerton suggests that the earlier myths or descriptions of German technical superiority were the result of British scientists own lobbying, and attempts to portray themselves as isolated figures instead of parts of a vast and well funded system He also includes a useful discussion on Frederick Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell, who moved beyond his role as a scientific advisor into a dominating figure on production, planning, and economic statistics in general, as leader of the S Branch.While the argument has apparently been repeated in part elsewhere, this book stands out with an impressive command of economic statistics there is even a chart comparing the loss of merchant shipping to the phases of the moon A provocative look, and one sure to spark intense debate.Though this book seems to be part of a broader trend in Edgerton s work, especially a history of the British warfare state Worth looking at

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