The Solitary Summer

The Solitary Summer This Delightful Companion To The FamousElizabeth And Her German Garden Is A Witty, Lyrical Account Of A Rejuvenating Summer Descriptions Of Magnificent Larkspurs And Burning Nasturtiums Give Way To Those Of Cooling Forest Walks, And Of Clambering Up The Mud Bank When The Miller Is Not In View Rainy Days Prompt A Little Philanthropy, Until The Sun Returns The Gardener To The Refuge Of Her Beloved Plants Yet The Months Are Not As Solitary As She D Planned There S The Man Of Wrath To Pacify And The April, May, And June Babies To Amuse Here, With The Pleasing Astringency For Which She Is Noted, Elizabeth Von Arnim Returns To The Heroine And The Garden She Immortalized

Mary Annette Beauchamp in Sydney, Australia, she was raised in England and in 1891 married Count Henning August von Arnim, a Prussian aristocrat, and the great great great grandson of King Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia She had met von Arnim during an Italian tour with her father They married in London but lived in Berlin and eventually moved to the countryside where, in Nassenheide, Pomerania, the von Arnims had their family estate The couple had five children, four daughters and a son The children s tutors at Nassenheide included E M Forster and Hugh Walpole.In 1898 she started her literary career by publishing Elizabeth and Her German Garden, a semi autobiographical novel about a rural idyll published anonymously and, as it turned out to be highly successful, reprinted 21 times within the first year Von Arnim wrote another 20 books, which were all published By the author of Elizabeth and Her German Garden.Count von Arnim died in 1910, and in 1916 Elizabeth married John Francis Stanley Russell, 2nd Earl Russell, Bertrand Russell s elder brother The marriage ended in disaster, with Elizabeth escaping to the United States and the couple finally agreeing, in 1919, to get a divorce She also had an affair with H G Wells.She was a cousin of

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  • Paperback
  • 208 pages
  • The Solitary Summer
  • Elizabeth von Arnim
  • English
  • 04 September 2017
  • 9781844082964

10 thoughts on “The Solitary Summer

  1. says:

    Doesn t quite reach the heights of Elizabeth and Her German Garden, but there are so many passages that just sing so joyously, and others that might have been lifted from Austen others that are horribly dated, some terribly modern, or grasping their way towards being so.My thoughts on this book and Elizabeth and Her German Garden may be found here at Book Riot

  2. says:

    What a blessing it is to love books Everybody must love something, and I know of no objects of love that give such unfailing returns as books and a garden I suspect that most readers will come to this having read and enjoyed Elizabeth and her German Garden, its predecessor The book picks up where it has left off, with a reiteration of her attempts to create a garden with its successes and failures , but from the first page she announces her intention and desire to be alone for a whole summer and get to the very dregs of life The book is divided into months and each month has at least two topics on which the author dwells on at some length Probably my favourite comes near the beginning, in June, when she describes favourite authors and how they are suited to different moods and landscapes Books have their idiosyncrasies as well as people, and will not show me their full beauties unless the pace and time in which they are read suits them Much given to what she describes herself as rhapsodies , Elizabeth s flights of fancy are tempered by her sly sense of humour and self awareness Although she takes her garden very seriously, she tends to poke fun at nearly everything else and since she does not have visitors to gently mock in this novel with the exception of some soldiers in September , she goes into far detail about the locals and their strange beliefs and ways The German passion for essen eating is also discussed, with much humour and some disgust , and there are many opportunities to contrast the higher and lower nature of her fellow Germans Love and sorrow appear to be flowers of civilisation, and most to flourish where life has the broadest margin of leisure and abundance.The Man of Wrath her husband and the April, May and June babies make cameo appearances again, but this book is almost entirely about Elizabeth and her passionate love of solitude and the beauties of her garden I enjoyed her below description of women, but don t think it much applies to this unique and self sufficient woman I would love to read a really good biography of her Women have a good deal of ivy nature still left in her, and an unhealthy caring for sympathy and support.

  3. says:

    Free download available at Project Gutenberg.Opening lines May 2nd Last night after dinner, when we were in the garden, I said, I want to be alone for a whole summer, and get to the very dregs of life I want to be as idle as I can, so that my soul may have time to grow Nobody shall be invited to stay with me, and if any one calls they will be told that I am out, or away, or sick I shall spend the months in the garden, and on the plain, and in the forests I shall watch the things that happen in my garden, and see where I have made mistakes Page 10 What a blessing it is to love books Everybody must love something, and I know of no objects of love that give such substantial and unfailing returns as books and a garden And how easy it would have been to come into the world without this, and possessed instead of an all consuming passion, say, for hats, perpetually raging round my empty soul Page 12 I prefer sitting here on the verandah and looking down through a frame of leaves at all the rosebuds June has put in the beds round the sun dial, to ponder over nothing, and just be glad that I am alive Page 39 Any story book or novel you take up is full of feeling descriptions of what everybody ate and drank, and there are a great many meals than kisses so that the novel reader who expects a love tale, finds with disgust that he is put off with menus Page 42 Oh a garden is a sweet, sane refuge to have Whether I am tired because I have enjoyed myself too much, or tired because I have lectured the servants too much, or tired because I have talked to missionaries too much, I have only to come down the verandah steps into the garden to be at once restored to quiet, and serenity, and my real and natural self What else should I say about this book Only this another little gem written by Elizabeth von Arnim.4 The Enchanted April3 The Adventures of Elizabeth in Rugen4 Elizabeth and Her German Garden3 The Solitary SummerTBR Christopher And ColumbusTBR Vera

  4. says:

    Its most interesting to see that a Solitary Summer in Elizabeth s World didn t mean going to live in splendid isolation in a wood somewhere. it just meant not having any house guests but spending time with a husband, children, servants and neighbours I wouldn t call that very solitary myself However it is a wonderful book with beautiful descriptions of nature and gardens and reading. and witty descriptions of neighbours and particularly the children There is a rather dark side to it, with some people living very difficult lives. I think her descriptions of the lives of the poor are far less sanitized than they usually are. I would love to have known Elizabeth, she is a delight I particularly loved it when she said how few of her friends really thought like her and that she grew distant from her closest friend because of an argument about being a goose girl Oh Elizabeth I would have agreed with you on the goose girl

  5. says:

    There are so many lovely passages in this book This is a sequel to Elizabeth and Her German Garden, which is also a favorite of mine What a blessing it is to love books Everybody must love something, and I know of no objects of love that give such substantial and unfailing returns as books and a garden How glad I am I need not hurry What a waste of life, just getting and spending Sitting by my pansy beds, with the slow clouds floating leisurely past, and all the clear day before me, I look on at the hot scramble for the pennies of existence and am lost in wonder at the vulgarity that pushes, and cringes, and tramples, untiring and unabashed And when you have got your pennies, what then They are only pennies, after all unpleasant, battered copper things, without a gold piece among them, and never worth the degradation of self, and the hatred of those below you who have fewer, and the derision of those above you who have I wish I were not so easily affected by each other s looks Sometimes, during the course of a long correspondence with a friend, he grows to be inexpressibly dear to me I see how beautiful his soul is, how fine his intellect, how generous his heart, and how he already possesses in great perfection those qualities of kindness, and patience, and simplicity, after which I have been so long and so vainly striving If one believed in angels one would feel that they love us best when we are asleep and cannot hurt each other and what a mercy it is that once in every twenty four hours we are too utterly weary to go on being unkind The doors shut, and the lights go out, and the sharpest tongue is silent, and all of us, scolder and scolded, happy and unhappy, master and slave, judge and culprit, are children again, tired, and hushed, and helpless, and forgiven.

  6. says:

    The Solitary Summer Elizabeth von ArnimTo the man of wrathWith some apologies and much loveOpening May 2nd Last night after dinner, when we were in the garden, I said, I want to be alone for a whole summer, and get to the very dregs of life I want to be as idle as I can, so that my soul may have time to grow Nobody shall be invited to stay with me, and if any one calls they will be told that I am out, or away, or sick I shall spend the months in the garden, and on the plain, and in the forests I shall watch the things that happen in my garden, and see where I have made mistakes On wet days I will go into the thickest parts of the forests, where the pine needles are everlastingly dry, and when the sun shines I ll lie on the heath and see how the broom flares against the clouds I shall be perpetually happy, because there will be no one to worry me Out there on the plain there is silence, and where there is silence I have discovered there is peace gardening sequel companion to 3 German Garden summer 2013ebook project gutenberghttp www.gutenberg.org ebooks 5991

  7. says:

    Well this is definately one of my favorite books ever I kept checking to see how much was left and winced to see the right side of the book dwindling Yes it s true that this seems to be a book about nothing Well, let me set you all straight, this book is about just who exactly, deep inside, for real and goodness sake this woman was And who she was, first of all, brave, for sharing it all with us She was also very funny and had this beautiful sense of just what beauty is I loved her witty sarcasm and astonishment at ignorance and customs the village poor that she, as lady of the big house felt responsible for She tells of a few summer months and the things that she loved, people she loved and was annoyed or irritated by She speaks to my soul, she made me laugh, made me think She speaks mostly of her garden, which must surely have been a sight to behold Like my other favorite book of hers, Enchanted April, this one whisks me away to a dreamland for grownups filled with beautiful flowers whose scents I can almost perceive I know this will be one I turn to again and again when I need comfort or soothing.

  8. says:

    Beautiful, beautiful writing Only 3 things I regret 1 apparently this was the sequel to a previous book, which I wish I had read first, 2 the book really should be read sitting outside under a tree in the summer, not on a business trip to Albuquerque in November, and 3 there was a terribly discordant judgmental passage in the book about children born out of wedlock, but I suppose Von Arnim was a product of her time and I shouldn t be too surprised.

  9. says:

    Seguito ideale de Il giardino di Elizabeth , questo secondo capitolo risulta un po meno brioso del primo ma comunque resta godibile Quello che si mantiene alto lo stile della Von Arnim che brava a descrivere luoghi e sensazioni senza ripetersi Sembra un libro che parla del niente ma ne parla talmente bene

  10. says:

    Utterly delightful, and I wanted to be in her garden with a book, and tea, and peace and quiet.

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